Author Archives: Thoughtscapism

About Thoughtscapism

Cell Biologist, volunteer science communicator, and fiction writer.

World’s Worst Energy Accidents in Environmental Perspective

I began my three-part series on energy accidents to answer the question: “What about Chernobyl?” This type of concern invariably comes up whenever nuclear power is discussed, as fear of nuclear accidents is something that is cemented into our cultural … Continue reading

Posted in biology, climate, energy, environment, history, nuclear, renewables, society | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

“What About Radioactive Wastelands?” A Look at Chernobyl’s Effects on Nature

“What about Chernobyl?” is a question many people ask whenever nuclear power is discussed. In my first look at that question, in the previous article, I put the World’s Deadliest Energy Accidents in Perspective. But many people will point out … Continue reading

Posted in biology, energy, environment, history, nuclear, psychology, society | Tagged , , , | 12 Comments

“What About Chernobyl?” World’s Deadliest Energy Accidents in Perspective

Whenever nuclear power comes up in discussions online, more often than not someone declares that all anyone needs to know can be said with one word: Chernobyl. This name evokes a chilling reaction in most of us, and the idea … Continue reading

Posted in energy, environment, health, nuclear, renewables | Tagged , | 17 Comments

Radiation Exposures at a Glance

Inspired by a risk conference I attended, I decided to try my hand at visual demonstrations of toxicological safety limits and pesticide exposures. It struck me that the same kind of visualisation might work well for a demonstrating radiation dosages. I … Continue reading

Posted in biology, health, nuclear | Tagged , , | 9 Comments

Toward More Intuitive Toxicology Information

Last week I had the privilege to attend a conference on risk science in New Orleans, and hold a roundtable together with neuroscientist Alison Bernstein from SciMoms. We were kindly invited to talk about our approach to risk communication by Center … Continue reading

Posted in agriculture, chemistry, health, science communication | Tagged , | 11 Comments

Nuclear is a Crucial Piece of the Carbon-Free Puzzle

The findings of the recent MIT study bear repeating: to achieve a carbon-free grid, exclusion of nuclear would make the effort much, much more expensive. the team’s analysis shows that the exclusion of nuclear from low-carbon scenarios could cause the … Continue reading

Posted in climate, energy, finance, nuclear, renewables | Tagged | 2 Comments

Saving Lives Is Not Shameful – Let’s Break the Stigma on Supporting Nuclear Energy

I own a t-shirt that says “Ask me about nuclear energy.” On the back there’s an image of a cooling tower and the words: “Sustainable. Ecological. Independent.” I wore it to my daughter’s first day at our village music kindergarten … Continue reading

Posted in energy, environment, nuclear, parenting, psychology, renewables, society | Tagged , | 14 Comments