Category Archives: science communication

From Ideas to Evidence, an Interview: My Organic Crisis and the Birth of This Blog

In four short years, since I started looking at the science of farming more closely, the topic of organic vs conventional has felt very worn out to me, several times. I already know how it will go: some people have … Continue reading

Posted in agriculture, chemistry, environment, health, meta, nutrition, organic, science communication | Tagged | 1 Comment

The Perils of Science Speak

What would you say if you were worried about chemical X in your environment, and to reassure you, someone told you: Scientists finished their devious plot called project ABC, which looks at chemicals in our homes to see if they are … Continue reading

Posted in linguistics, meta, science communication | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Welcome to Thoughtscapism

I want to understand the world, which makes me passionate about science. I wish to express and explore the human condition through language, which makes me passionate about writing. In order to do these things, I must question my assumptions, test the limits … Continue reading

Posted in literature, meta, science communication | Leave a comment

Why It’s So Hard to Talk About GMOs

Despite our best intentions, discussions about GMOs often quickly degenerate into shouting matches. If we really want to make a difference, we should consider the psychology of how and why our views are formed, and help others do the same. Instead of eagerly fighting with facts, the effect of kindness and curiosity on a debate could surprise you. Continue reading

Posted in agriculture, health, psychology, science communication | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Injecting Kindness into the Debate

Vaccines are a topic that stir up a lot of emotions. How should we talk about them? Will anything we do make a difference? What if we frame the question somewhat differently: can we make a difference by the way behave in our interactions with other people? Continue reading

Posted in epistemology, existentialism, health, medicine, psychology, science, science communication, society, vaccines | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Why Science?

Why science? Because science is the one gig in town that’s sitting down around the table and thinking hard on ‘how can we truly know something?’ Continue reading

Posted in consensus, epistemology, health, medicine, methods, science, science communication, vaccines | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments