Author Archives: Thoughtscapism

About Thoughtscapism

Cell Biologist, volunteer science communicator, and fiction writer.

Coop Forbidden to Use “The Organic Effect” Marketing Video Under Threat of Fine of One Million Krona

Quick news: Swedish media seem very silent on the topic (EDIT: it appears I was just fast – several news pieces have come since), as court rules grocery chain Coop is forbidden from continued use of its marketing video “The Organic … Continue reading

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New Study Finds Neonicotinoids May Have Harmful, Beneficial, or No Effects on Bees

Two new bee papers were published just a few days ago. Below I will take a closer look at one of them, the larger European study, partly funded by pesticide companies but performed by an independent research lab, and it was … Continue reading

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From Ideas to Evidence, an Interview: My Organic Crisis and the Birth of This Blog

In four short years, since I started looking at the science of farming more closely, the topic of organic vs conventional has felt very worn out to me, several times. I already know how it will go: some people have … Continue reading

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Innocent Questions

My daughter demanded I draw another comic, so I’m sharing with you this macabre moment of innocent deduction, which invited some reflection on why we care so deeply for the bodies of our dead.

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The Bacterial Cutting Board – What’s Actually Going On In My Stomach?

I am a biologist, and I love to tell my kids about the ways their bodies work, including how fascinating it is that millions of strange little organisms live inside their gut and help with the digestion of their food. It’s … Continue reading

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Trying to Apply Intuition to Physics

I sympathise. How can anything be smaller than a really tight squeeze? Unfathomable. It’s interesting how our perception, which is quite useful for observing phenomena happening at our scale, gets bent over backward and whirled around when we try to apply … Continue reading

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Extreme Nature Spells – When Scientists’ Kids Fight

Thanks to their tireless search for the ultimate things in life (that is, the constant bombardment with questions like ‘What’s the smallest thing you know of in the whole world?’ and ‘What is the hottest thing you know?’) kids are … Continue reading

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