Author Archives: Thoughtscapism

About Thoughtscapism

Cell Biologist, science communicator, an agricultural and biodiversity analyst, and a fiction writer.

Berlin Critical Climate Action: roller skating nuclear polar bears fight fossil dinosaurs and Prof Hansen speaks

Environmentalists and Mothers for Nuclear take a stand for the climate fight in Germany, where popular support for nuclear grows while politicians are on track to cause one billion tons of excess emissions due to a 2022 nuclear exit. Continue reading

Posted in climate, energy, environment, nuclear, society | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

The EU Poised to Allow Gene-editing to Improve Farming Methods and Nutrition

The current EU GMO-legislation, based on late 1990s understanding of biotechnology, would leave Europe without access to current and future gene-edited crops, including existing ones like fortified tomatoes, soybeans with healthier fatty acid profiles, and nitrogen-fixing bacteria for fertilising agricultural … Continue reading

Posted in agriculture, biology, environment, nutrition, organic, society | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

COVID-19 Vaccine Suspensions May Be Rash Rather than Precautionary

The wish to take time for careful deliberation of risks, which in itself is perfectly reasonable, immediately lead to decisions to suspend the vaccine while authorities deliberated. This is indicative of a natural quick and less measured reaction happening in tandem with the appropriate data-analysis. The natural reaction to be particularly averse of man-made, unfamiliar risks (like those from vaccine side-effects) easily overshadows our appreciation of natural ones (like the continuing spread and death toll from the pandemic). It feels more reassuring to actively take a step to avoid a risk (vaccination side-effect), while passively allowing the risk of disease to continue. Continue reading

Posted in health, medicine, science communication, society, vaccines | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Contaminated Concepts about Chernobyl

Visiting Chernobyl is an opportunity to reflect on a tragic piece of history, but also our own risk perceptions. It is not dangerous. It offers a great chance to observe thriving wildlife – no three headed fish or glow-in-the-dark rats among them. Continue reading

Posted in energy, environment, nuclear, psychology, science communication, society | Tagged , | 6 Comments

The Animals of Chernobyl – Trip Report, Day Three

It was a great juxtaposition to see all this natural life so near the reactor sites. The wildlife doesn’t care about the thought of the radiation, since its presence at these levels has no practical effect on them. The animals aren’t afraid. Continue reading

Posted in biology, energy, environment, health, nuclear | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

The Town That Remained Despite the Chernobyl Accident

Officially the people of Narodychi were told to leave their homes three decades ago – but they never left. Their lives went on. Continue reading

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Visiting Chernobyl, Day One, The Most Dangerous Part of the Trip: Kyiv

I finally found time to write about my visit to Chernobyl. I hope to do justice to the tremendous impression left by the people I got to meet, including locals living in the area, former clean-up workers, as well as … Continue reading

Posted in energy, environment, nuclear | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Decarbonisation at a Discount? Let’s Not Sell Future Generations Short

Economy: an intricate system of mediums of exchange that enables many complex workings of our societies. It’s a wondrous interconnected network of symbols, really, a true testament to human ability of abstract thought. How we should best steer or influence … Continue reading

Posted in climate, energy, finance, nuclear, renewables, society | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

The Risks of Failed Risk Assessments On Natural vs Unfamiliar Sources of Energy

German society Nuklearia kindly invited me to write about risk perceptions on the topic of energy on their blog, where this piece originally appeared in German. You can read it in English below. Humans are naturally bad at assessing complex … Continue reading

Posted in climate, energy, health, psychology | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

What Level of Risk Justifies Denying People Their Homes? A Look at Fukushima vs Pollution in Big Cities

I was very moved after hearing the heartfelt testimonies of teacher Yoshiko Aoki, high-school student Moe Harada, and a group of students dialling in from Fukushima to the OECD NEA risk communication workshop in Paris. I previously shared with you … Continue reading

Posted in energy, environment, health, nuclear, psychology, society | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments